Easter challenge – the results are in!

I’m so glad so many wanted to join the challenge, and I loooove the photos you sent me!

I’ll just put the photos here, in no particular order, for everyone to enjoy! I see happy dogs, a good time, and photographers who maybe struggled a little to find different interpretations of “easter” and now have a little more experience than they had before 🙂 And cute puppies! They are always right.

Don’t forget to click on the photos to see them full size!

All these photographers will receive a reward from me in their inbox this week. I am a reward-based trainer after all 😉

Coming up: a surprise that I think you will really like! I put a lot of time and effort into this, don’t miss it!

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Photoshop: How to add text and frames to your photos, the fast and easy way!

I love postcards. Christmas, birthdays, easter…And I make them myself, real quick and easy, in photoshop.

It’s really easy, and fun! In the short film below I show how to add text and frames to your photos. Fast and simple! Ready to print and send or give to your loved ones, or put on facebook for everyone to see 🙂

Share your work with me! I’d love to see what you make!

Coming up: Put something in front of your dog – create depth with foreground!

Five easter-photos that will bring a smile to your face. Kelpiestyle!

The week of easter has begun!

To give you some inspiration for the perfect easter-photo with your dog, here are five different ideas to try out!

  1. Sitting with an easter-basket. This is the one I already had in my head. Now, I wanted her to lift her head up towards me (left), but as I look at the photos I like the one to the right better. Lesson: ALWAYS try different angles and perspective!

Want to see how I taught her to lift and hold the basket? Look at the film in the challenge!

2. When you work with a dog, things will happen and the dog will move. Go with it! You can always put the dog back in a location where you want it to be, but it’s the photos of the dog doing her own stuff that often comes out looking the best!

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I love this one! Maybe she caught sight of the easterbunny?

3. “My precioussss…” Midori knows how to touch stuff with her nose and hold still – perfect to make her pose with an egg!

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4. Let the creativity flow, and put some humour in it! (No real chickens were harmed during this shoot!)

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5. Don’t forget to just let the dogs personality come out! I chose the background and light carefully, and just started shooting. After about ten photos I got this.

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I look forward to seeing your photos! E-mail me at hello@kelpiephoto.com, or post a comment with a link, or post your photo at Kelpiephotos facebook-page, or tag me on instagram @kelpiephotography!

Coming up: use photoshop to create an easter-postcard!

Five ways to destroy a would-be good photo

Of course there are more than five ways to make a photo look terrible, but let’s focus on surroundings today. Choosing poorly when it comes to location is a sure way to ruin a good photo!

Here are my top five worst nightmares when it comes to background in photos:

1. Do not think of the surroundings at all. There is a fence, a building, and a dog, but all you look at is your model-dog. Because he’s cute anyway, right? Of course he is. But to someone that isn’t as in love with your dog as you are it’s simply a bad photo.

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Our brain tricks us into “not seeing” the things that are not important to us, expecially when we look in the viewfinder. Train yourself to be observant and avoid photos like this!

2. Choose a messy background. Not necessarily unclean, but with a lot of stuff going on. Shapes, colours, chaos. Your dog gets lost in the surroundings and the viewer gets confused. But maybe that’s what you want? I sure don’t.

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This actually has potential, I like how the colours match. Maybe I´ll come back to this and give it a try. But right now – too messy!

3. Think that a large aperture will make it blurry enough to save any photo. Sorry, that’s just lazy AND wrong. The background you choose should have a purpose, and bring something to the photo. A large aperture can make stunning soft dreamy photos, but you still need a nice background to begin with.

4. When you do find a nice place,  stay in one angle and take one photo. I mean, why experiment? I am sure that you – unlike me – always get it perfect in the first shot. God forbid that you try to think differently and get another result than the obvious!

5. Believe in the power of photoshop. You can edit anything, right? No need to move on meter to the left and avoid a house, that’s what the clone-tool us for!

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Of course I can remove the tree, the wires and the branch in photoshop. (And the collar.) But it is so much faster and easier to just move my feet a bit…

I actually think a lot about choosing the right environment for (almost) every photo. What do I want it to “feel” like? Urban, natural, freedom, cozy? What colour should it be? I often want it to complement the colour of my dog. Normally all dogs look good with green grass and blue skies, but you can do so much more!

Maybe I want the background to help the viewer “get the story”? Sheepdog with sheep, agiliydog on the agilitycourse, huntingdog in the forest, and so on. That also helps my decision of aperture-setting, do I want the background sharp or blurry? It all depends on what I want to portrait.

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And I’m lazy. I don’t want to have to spend a lot of time fixing stuff with my computer, I prefer to get it right from the start. It’s easier that way.

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Colours that complement, clean and makes it easy to focus on her face, and a nice bokeh. I love this one.

So…back to your easterphoto-challenge. What background do YOU want in YOUR photo? What story do you want to tell?

I challenge you – easter photo!

In two weeks it’s easter. Eggs, bunnies, daffodils, chickens, and feathers…(And candy. Lots of it!) I find that every feast is an excuse to take a theme-photo, with props and stuff. This is one of my easter-photos from last year:

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“Glad påsk” means “happy easter”.

This year I have a different idea, and I will let you tag along behind the scenes! And more than that:

I CHALLENGE YOU!

Take an easter-photo of your own! It can be of anything, but it must relate to easter. E-mail it to me before 16/4, and I’ll post it here. Fun, right? I KNOW!!!

And share it with your friends, if you want to challenge them in your turn…The more the merrier 🙂

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Easter-lamb anyone?

Let’s get you started!

  1. Find inspiration. Pinterest, google, facebook…
  2. Find location. What environment?
  3. Props or no props?
  4. Do you need to train the dog (if you are using a dog), or get it used to anything?
  5. Take photos. Many. Different perspective, angle, distance…make sure you reward your dog for being a good model.
  6. Choose your favourite photo.
  7. Edit it – if you want to.
  8. E-mail it to me!

DONE! I’ll even reward you with a little something 😉

So…I have my goal-photo in my head, I know the right location, I have bought my props. Yesterday I trained my dog, and I will give you the short version instead of all 16 minutes of how I did:

Only one thing left:

GET GOING!

Need some pointers?

Download five steps to better dog-photos!

CLICK HERE!

Coming up: how do you choose your “perfect location”?